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SEND Information Report

Last reviewed January 2020

Welcome to our Special Educational Needs Information Report

At Brooklands Primary School we are proud to be an inclusive school where every child, every adult, every day and every minute matters. We are enthusiastic about the journey of our children that takes place every day as they grow in front of our eyes. We are grateful that we can witness the little changes that happen through time, the small steps our children take towards their future.

 

What is the SEND Information Report?

The SEND Information Report is the breakdown of how schools use the Local Authority Local Offer to support pupils with SEND (Special Educational Needs and/or Disability) and meet their needs. It also explains the provision the schools are able to put in place for pupils with SEND. This report has been written to comply with the Children and Families Act, 2014 as well as the SEN Code of Practice, 2015 and it is reviewed annually or whenever changes are made.

 

What is the Local Authority Local Offer?

The Local Offer, explains how to access services that are available in the local area for children and young people from birth to 25 years old, who have special educational needs and/or disability.  The Local Offer for Derbyshire can be found here: www.derbyshiresendlocaloffer.org

When does a child have Special Educational Needs?

The code of practice clearly states that a child has Special Educational Needs (SEN) where their learning difficulty or disability calls for special educational provision, different from or additional to that normally available to pupils of the same age. (Code of Practice 2015, Identifying SEN in schools, 6.15, page 94)

That means that not all pupils that have a learning difficulty or disability have Special Educational Needs. Our entry and exit criteria for the SEN register at Brooklands is following the Code of Practice guidelines. If you suspect that your child might have a learning difficulty or/and a Special Educational Need, speak to their teacher or the school’s SENDCo.

 

What are the four areas of need?

There are four areas of need. These areas often overlap and therefore the provision for each pupil might be different depending on their needs.

Venn diagram

Communication and Interaction

This area of need includes children with Autism Spectrum condition and those with Speech, Language and Communication needs.

Children and young people with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) have difficulty in communicating with others. This may be because they have difficulty saying what they want to, understanding what is being said to them or they do not understand or use social rules of communication.

Cognition and learning

This area includes children with Specific Learning Difficulties, Severe Learning Difficulties, Moderate Learning Difficulties, Profound Learning Difficulties and Multiple Learning Difficulties.

Support for learning may be required when children and young people learn at a slower pace than their peers, even with appropriate differentiation. Specific learning difficulties (SpLD), affect one or more specific aspects of learning. This encompasses a range of conditions such as dyslexia, dyscalculia and dyspraxia.

Social, emotional and mental health difficulties

This area includes children with any social, emotional or mental health that is impacting on their ability to learn.

Children and young people may experience a wide range of social and emotional difficulties which manifest themselves in many ways. These may include becoming withdrawn or isolated, as well as displaying challenging, disruptive or disturbing behaviour. These behaviours may reflect underlying mental health difficulties such as anxiety or depression, self-harming, substance misuse, eating disorders or physical symptoms that are medically unexplained. The Code of Practice clarifies that persistent disruptive or withdrawn behaviours do not necessarily mean that a child or young person has SEN. Where there are concerns, there should be an assessment to determine whether there are any casual factors such as undiagnosed learning difficulties, difficulties with communication or mental health issues. If it is thought housing, family or other domestic circumstances may be distributing to the presenting behaviour a multi-agency approach may be necessary. (Code of Practice 2015, Identifying SEN in schools, 6.21, page 96)

Other children and young people may have disorders such as attention deficit disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or attachment disorder.

Sensory and/or physical needs

This area includes children with hearing, visual or multi-sensory impairment as well as children with physical difficulties.

Some children and young people require special educational provision because they have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of the educational facilities generally provided. These difficulties can be age related and may fluctuate over time. Many children with and young people with vision impairment (VI), hearing impairment (HI) or a multi-sensory impairment (MSI) will require specialist support and/or equipment to access their learning, or habilitation support. Some children and young people with a physical disability (PD) require additional ongoing support and equipment to access all the opportunities available to their peers.

How are pupils with SEN supported in school?

·         Multi agency team·         Educational Psychologist·         Autism Outreach

·         CAMHS

·         Nurture group

·         Social worker

·         Individual support from TA

·         SEN Support Plan

·         GRIP or EHCP

FEW – wave 3 ·         Exam access arrangements·         Coloured overlays·         Differentiated curriculum

·         Individual support from TA

·         SEN Support Plan

·         GRIP or EHCP

FEW – wave 3 ·         Multi agency team·         Educational Psychologist·         Autism Outreach

·         CAMHS

·         Nurture group

·         Social worker

·         SEN Support Plan

·         GRIP or EHCP

FEW – wave 3 ·         Exam arrangements·         Physiotherapy service·         Radio aids

·         Hearing impairment service

·         Physical impairment service

·         SEN Support Plan

·         GRIP or EHCP

·         Behaviour plan·         Visual timetable·         Group support / intervention

·         Nurture group

·         Social skills intervention

·         Personalised visual timetable

SOME – wave 2 ·         Access to alternative resources·         Group support / intervention·         Overlearn and repetition of basic skills / individualised planning SOME – wave 2 ·         Group support / intervention·         Behaviour plan·         Group support / intervention

·         Social skills intervention

·         Personalised visual timetable

SOME – wave 2 ·         Fine motor skills·         Writing slopes·         Use of computing resources

·         Group support / intervention

·         Fine motor skills practice

·         Alternative recording and representation methods

·         Disabled toilets

·         Disabled car park

·         Staff awareness of individual needs·         Differentiation·         Rewards and encouraging approach

·         Quality first teaching

·         Parental involvement

·         Transition between phases

·         Broad curriculum

ALL- wave 1 ·         Staff awareness of individual needs·         Differentiation·         Rewards and encouraging approach

·         Quality first teaching

·         Parental involvement

·         Transition between phases

·         Broad curriculum

ALL- wave 1 ·         Staff awareness of individual needs·         Differentiation·         Rewards and encouraging approach

·         Quality first teaching

·         Parental involvement

·         Transition between phases

·         Broad curriculum

ALL- wave 1 ·         Staff awareness of individual needs·         Differentiation·         Rewards and encouraging approach

·         Quality first teaching

·         Parental involvement

·         Transition between phases

·         Broad curriculum

Communication and interaction Cognition and Learning Social, Emotional Mental Health Sensory and/or physical

 

When a child is identified as having SEN their progress, attainment and provision is monitored by the SENDCo. The pupil has an individualised SEN Support Plan that is tailored to the pupil’s needs. The SEN Support Plan follows the access, plan, do, review cycle and is reviewed regularly. The review process will evaluate the impact of the support and interventions. Parents and pupils are part of this process and their views contribute to this process. Parents are informed about their child’s SEN Support Plan, at least three times a year. This usually happens twice during parents evening meetings and once at the end of the academic year. If necessary, meetings take place more often to ensure that the pupil’s needs are met, the provision has a positive impact and that communication between home and school is effective. For some pupils, additional funding might be available based on the complexity of the pupil’s needs and the provision already available.

When can a child or young person get an EHCP (Educational Health Care Plan)?

If a child or young person has complex educational and health needs, an EHCP needs assessment can be requested. The request can be made by the school, parents, health or social care. The Local Authority will then collect evidence and information from a variety of sources like teachers, parents, social care, health professionals as well as the pupil. After evaluating the evidence that have been collected, the Local Authority will decide whether the pupil is eligible for an EHCP. Parents have the right to appeal against the decision made. EHCPs are reviewed annually and parents and the pupil are being included in the reviewing process.

 

Does a child with SEND have access to the same lessons?

All pupils in school have access to a balanced, broadly based curriculum. All teachers are responsible for providing that balanced and broad curriculum to all pupils. Depending on the pupils’ needs adjustments may be made in order to enable the pupil to engage with learning and access the curriculum. The Code of Practice clearly defines that all teachers are teachers of pupils with SEND. All teachers are responsible for identifying pupils with SEND and, in collaboration with the SENDCo, they are responsible to ensure that the needs of those pupils are met through differentiation and when necessary, additional provision above and beyond the one available to the rest of the class.

 

How can I make a complaint?

We always aim to have an effective and healthy relationship with all parents as we both want the best possible outcome for the children. If despite our efforts you are unhappy with anything related to a pupil with SEND please follow the next steps:

-Firstly arrange a meeting with the class teacher at a mutual convenient time.

-If the situation has not been resolved arrange a meeting with the SENDCo and class teacher.

-If the situation remains unresolved, an appointment should be made with the Head of school.